Hire an MU PhD

Adriana Boersner

Adriana Boersner
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     I am a recent PhD in Political Science. Currently, I am an independent researcher working on issues related to political violence in Latin America.  My primary research interests include foreign policy analysis, the comparative study of authoritarian regimes, and political psychology. My dissertation focused on foreign policy decisions in personal dictatorships and the choice of military intervention in civil wars. My work also extends to the study of the role of Latin American elites in world politics, political violence, voting behavior in Latin America, and the effects of international investments in developing economies. Before coming to the University of Missouri as a Fulbright Scholar, I worked as an Assistant Professor in Venezuela. 

Hanna Brant

Hanna Brant
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     I am a doctoral candidate in Political Science with concentrations in American Politics and Public Policy and Administration. My dissertation examines how personnel management of staff impacts legislatures. I explore this dynamic at both the congressional and state level within the United States through the lens of staff turnover. I also have substantive interests in understanding how congressional staffers supplement congressional capacity to draft legislation and conduct oversight, the contours of political careers of members of Congress, and the impact of women in legislatures. My research has been supported by the Dirksen Congressional Center and the Center for Effective Lawmaking and is published or forthcoming in journals such as Congress & the Presidency, Journal of Women, Politics & Policy, and Social Science Quarterly. I have experience teaching and developing the following courses: Introduction to American Government (online and in-person), Women and U.S. Politics, and State Government. With minimal preparation, I am prepared to teach courses on the U.S. presidency, legislative process, court system, research methods, public policy, and public administration.

Jordan Butcher Jordan Butcher
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     I study American politics with a focus on state government. Specifically, my work evaluates the unintended consequences of institutional rules by assessing how they alter the function of state legislatures. My dissertation evaluates the long-term effects of legislative term limits in the states by comparing states with and without term limits. My work pushes our current understanding of legislative institutions by testing the theories scholars have long believed to be true. By examining the changes that legislatures endure, my work brings to light how stable institutional structures are by highlighting the legislature's ability to adapt changes such as term limits. 
 
Cody Drolc

Cody Drolc
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    I am a PhD candidate in the Department of Political Science at the University of Missouri. My research focuses on the broader network of government oversight as it relates to the implementation of public policies with a specific emphasis on the relationship between executive branch agencies, Congress, and experts. I have additional research interests related to themes in public policy and executive branch politics. This includes projects that explore how agencies respond to implementation problems in the Social Security Disability program, how presidents use the dual strategies of politicization and centralization to pursue their policy goals through the regulatory process, and investigating under what common conditions scholars may find misleading patterns of spatial policy diffusion.

Edward Goldring Edward Goldring
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   I am a PhD Candidate in Political Science at the University of Missouri, and for academic year 2019-20 a US-Asia Grand Strategy Predoctoral Fellow at the University of Southern California and a Korea Foundation Fellow. I study how non-democratic leaders maintain power. My dissertation examines the causes of elite purges in dictatorships at the cross-national and individual-levels. A dictator’s threat environment structures their incentives and opportunities to engage in elite purges. However, dictators respond to threats differently at the national and individual-levels. I test various hypotheses with a range of original quantitative and qualitative data, including individual-level quantitative data on elite purges in Kim Jong-un’s North Korea. My work has been published or is forthcoming in journals including Comparative Political Studies, Journal of Peace Research, Party Politics, Democratization, and Research & Politics.
Myunghee Lee Myunghee Lee
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    I am a PhD candidate in Political Science. My research focuses on contentious politics and protest movements in both authoritarian and democratic countries. I am also interested in authoritarian regimes, democratization, repression, human rights, and NGOs. With my language proficiency of both Korean and Mandarin Chinese, my geographic focus is East/Southeast Asia, South/North Korea, and China. My dissertation, Authoritarian Successor Parties and Political Protest in Asia, examines Asian third wave democracies and how authoritarian legacy shapes post-democratization mobilization environment. Recently, I finished my field research in South Korea for my dissertation. This trip was funded by a field research grant awarded by University of Missouri. My research relies on both quantitative and qualitative approaches. Particularly, I am highly trained for quantitative methodology. Bayesian modeling, multilevel modeling, GIS, and data visualization approaches are frequently employed in my research.
Theodore Masthay

Theodore Masthay
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     I am currently a Visiting Assistant Professor of Political Science at Wabash College where I teach courses on Congress, the presidency, elections, and the intersection of sports and politics in addition to directing several undergraduate research projects. My research largely focuses on legislative careers in the United States. More specifically, it focuses on how partisan identification affects the decisions legislators make about career advancement opportunities. My research has appeared in Political Research Quarterly, Social Science Quarterly, and has been featured numerous times on the London School of Economics American Politics and Policy Blog.

Brandon Beomseob Park

Brandon Beomseob Park
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     I am a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at The College of New Jersey, where I teach International Relations, Politics and Society of Developing Countries, and East Asian Politics. My research focuses on how international factors such as economic sanctions and trade agreements affect domestic politics (i.e. incumbent electoral performance, human rights etc.). I also examine the role of the economy in voting behavior, public opinion and party competition. My publications appear in Political Research Quarterly, Party Politics, International Political Science Review, West European Politics, and Conflict Management and Peace Science

Tiffanesha Williams

Tiffanesha Williams
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     I am a recent PhD with an emphasis in Comparative Politics and International Relations. During the 2019-2020 AY, I will be a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Government at American University. In terms of research, I am primarily interested in the relationship between colonial education policies and state building and capacity in post-colonial states. My other research interests include comparative bureaucracy, and water politics and conflict. I have experience developing and teaching the following courses: Comparative Political Systems; Introduction to International Relations; East and Southeast Asian Politics; and Regional Security Issues: The Asia Pacific.

Emir Yazici Emir Yazici
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     I am a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Political Science at the University of Missouri. My research focuses on political violence, nationalism, and ethnic politics. More specifically, I study the role of transborder identities in political violence at domestic and international level. My work has been published or is forthcoming in journals including International Security, Conflict Management and Peace Science, and Political Research Quarterly.
T. Murat Yildirim T. Murat Yildirim
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Comparative Politics, Policy & Administration